2015 a record year for citations in books

Since 1997 there has not been a year in which fewer than nine new books have cited my research. Here is a bar graph showing that 2015, with 16 such citations, is the most encouraging yet:

bookcites

Another encouraging sign is that The Masters Revealed is back in print from State University of New York Press after a couple of years out of print; it accounts for the great majority of scholarly and popular authors’ citations.

Dna.land and Ambiguity

Having just learned of a new admixture calculator through discussions at Melungeons and Friends, the largest Facebook group devoted to such conversations, I hastened to submit my DNA data to see how it compared to the four major companies’ estimates and the seven offered for free on GEDMATCH.  Here is the result:

dnaland

Several things about this admixture estimate are interesting as contrasts and comparisons to previous ones. The European percentage in all of them is more than 98%, but the breakdown of the European is all over the map. The high Italian percentage calculated by dna.land echoes the high number of population matches in Italy found by DNA Tribes years ago. But while many other admixture models find substantial amounts of Mediterranean ancestry, WHICH Mediterranean countries are cited ranges from Iberia and North Africa to the Middle East, with no consistency. As for the non-European aspect, I had already concluded it was ambiguous, with different tests yielding all subSaharan African and none, a high amount of South Asian and none, and small amounts of Native American and none. At least dna.land is honest in telling me the evidence is ambiguous, whereas all the other results collectively tell me so but none of them individually has said so– until now.