DNA relatives map

cousinmap.png
>Lately I’ve had time to explore the various features of 23andme in greater depth, and there is one that is particularly intriguing as it reveals something about migration patterns over two centuries.  There are 393 individuals in the database who have been identified as my cousins to various degrees, and the site produces maps at various levels of detail showing where those people are.  The greatest concentration is in North Carolina and Virginia, reflecting three of my grandparents being from the region along the state line.  My northern grandfather’s parents were both Ohio-born, but had ancestors who passed through New York state en route from New England.  Hence Ohio and New York come next in order.  The swath of cousins across the deep South, up to Missouri and down to Texas, reflects the migrations of Carolinians and Virginians in the 19th century.  And the one bright spot in the West, Utah, shows that Mormon missionaries were successful in converting Southerners as well as Midwesterners.  The “clustering” depiction combines adjacent states but the “top locations” gives a breakdown: North Carolina-18, Virginia-16, South Carolina-11, New York-9, Georgia-9, Pennsylvania-9, and (more than any other US state) Scotland-8, Ireland-8.
added July 2013–
Only two months later the totals have increased to:
Virginia, USA (24)
North Carolina, USA (22)
New York, NY, USA (18)
South Carolina, USA (14)
Georgia, USA (13)
Pennsylvania, USA (12)
Ireland (12)
England, UK (10)

 

The non-clustered relatives map is an impressive representation of how illusory the distinction between northerners and southerners can be in the border states.

200 citations, 16 countries, 23 states

Among the rewards provided to authors by Google Books and Amazon is knowing when, where, and by whom their works are cited in other books.  Some years ago I started keeping a record on my Backintyme blog, mainly for my own encouragement.  Years after a book’s sales diminish to near-zero, other writers can continue to find it useful in their own research.  Today the total reached 200, the occasion for this celebratory post. The books were published in sixteen countries, twenty-two states, and the District of Columbia, in chronological order of appearance:

France, US, Netherlands, United Kingdom, Belgium, Spain, India, Italy, Germany, Sweden, Denmark, Brazil, Canada, Argentina, Romania, Switzerland; Georgia, Michigan, Maine, New York, Illinois, Arizona, Indiana, California, Wisconsin, Connecticut, Florida, New Jersey, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Vermont, Minnesota, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, South Carolina, Tennessee, North Carolina.